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Perennial Premiere prospectus

Our horticulture staff are waiting for you!

Our horticulture staff are waiting for you!

After the brutal winter Mother Nature sent us this year, I am wondering if we’ll have a Stravinsky spring! But regardless of the weather, the path to a wonderful growing season starts by attending the fifth annual expanded Perennial Premiere Plant Sale on Saturday, April 26 and Sunday, April 27. This annual salute to spring will have something for everyone’s gardening style: from traditional-in-ground gardens to container terrarium and bonsai gardens. Whether you are a novice planning your first ever garden, or a long-time gardener looking for some new inspiration, our trained staff of horticulturists will be present to help you choose plants for your individual site and lifestyle.

You can sign up for an IMA membership on-site!

You can sign up for an IMA membership on-site!

IMA Member Preview Hours are 9 to 11 am on Saturday, and members will receive a 20 percent discount on all Greenhouse purchases through May 4. Not an IMA member? Not a problem! You can join on-the-spot and immediately begin taking advantage of this wonderful opportunity to have ‘first pick’ of all the plants and merchandise AND 20 percent off all Greenhouse purchases! Plus this year, all new members will receive a small native tree, while supplies last. We are open to the public on Saturday, 11 am to 5 pm, and Sunday noon to 5 pm.

Food trucks will be available for hungry shoppers.

Food trucks will be available for hungry shoppers.

To enhance your shopping experience, many regional vendors we call our Perennial Partners will be available. Some of the Perennial Partners will be old friends you’ve come to expect, and some are new additions. There will be guided Garden Tours and Lilly House tours, food trucks, a Bonsai exhibition and demonstrations in Deer Zink Special Events Pavilion, free off-site parking at the Interchurch Center and a shuttle running between the Museum and the Greenhouse.

The Greenhouse is proud to offer a great selection of native plants as well as plants that have earned stellar reputations by being real workhorses in our very challenging zone. In addition, we will have a wide selection of new and unusual plants, annuals (weather-permitting), tropicals, herbs, houseplants, small trees, shrubs and orchids. Download a list of plants that are on order.

Because a picture is worth a thousand words, here are a few images of some of what’s new for 2014 …

Now that you’re drooling … please join me in crossing your fingers that this will become a Vivaldi spring!

Filed under: Greenhouse, Horticulture, Oldfields

 

Creating an Autoportrait: Marc Anderson

Obscured beneath the simple words, numbers, shapes, and colors found in much of Robert Indiana’s work are essential memories and symbols of the artist’s life. Indiana’s visual vocabulary is encrypted with personal symbolism. This is particularly evident in his long series of Autoportraits.

To complement The Essential Robert Indiana, on view through May 4, the IMA invites visitors both on-site and online to Create Your Autoportrait using some of the same elements that Robert Indiana incorporates in to his. During the run of the exhibition, IMA staff members will be creating their own Autoportraits and blogging about it.

The eighth post in this series features Marc Anderson, the IMA’s preparator. For those not familiar with the term “preparator,” that means Marc is part of the team that builds and installs exhibits and displays.

autoportrait_ma_041414_01

Here are a few things about me: I really like working here installing art, and I also enjoy eating/making food, groovin’ to music, petting cats, doing math in my head, recording sound effects, and taking pictures.

"Art Hero" Josh at work on Julianne Swartz's "How Deep Is Your."

“Art Hero” Josh at work on Julianne Swartz’s “How Deep Is Your.”

As an installer of art, I have the privilege of working behind-the-scenes with the rest of the collection support staff/art heroes. The amount of effort and energy that goes into preserving and displaying artwork is pretty incredible! Most of it goes sight unseen, and much of it is not very glamorous, or all that interesting to most people. Though sometimes we face unique challenges that are REALLY far removed from our normal duties. They are opportunities only made possible in the name of art. I like to capture those ridiculous moments; included here is one of Josh going above and beyond.

So, on to my Autoportrait:

  • 8: musical notes on my tiny xylophone and the best visual shape.
  • 617 & 314: Boston and St. Louis are places I once called home.
  • Resonance:  The physics of how sound is made fascinates me to no end!
  • Sugar: My favorite food group and Stevie Wonder song.
  • I used these colors because navy blue was not a choice. They also look really good together.

Filed under: Art, Conservation, Exhibitions, IMA Staff, Installation

 

Creating an Autoportrait: Caitlyn Phipps

Obscured beneath the simple words, numbers, shapes, and colors found in much of Robert Indiana’s work are essential memories and symbols of the artist’s life. Indiana’s visual vocabulary is encrypted with personal symbolism. This is particularly evident in his long series of Autoportraits.

To complement The Essential Robert Indiana, on view through May 4, the IMA invites visitors both on-site and online to Create Your Autoportrait using some of the same elements that Robert Indiana incorporates in to his. During the run of the exhibition, IMA staff members will be creating their own Autoportraits and blogging about it.

The seventh in this series features intern Caitlyn Phipps, the IMA Scholar in  the Conservation Science Lab since January, shares her Autoportrait.

autoportrait_cp_040714

I decided to do a mix-up of things that have made impacts on my life during college. 3 stands for the number of times I switched my major to something other than chemistry, but now I can’t imagine not studying chemistry! 512 stands for May 2012, the year I graduated Wingate University with my bachelor’s in Chemistry and also the month that my mom finished her chemotherapy treatments for breast cancer. All which happened in a matter of 3 days, so May 2012 really means a lot to me. 262 stands for the 2 colleges I have studied at (Wingate University and Western Carolina University), 6 years I have been in college , and 2 degrees in total. JHSWGS are the advisors that I have had over the last six years, all have helped me along the way and I truly don’t know where I would be without them. NCSWDRIN are the places I have been in the last six years: North Carolina, Switzerland, Dominican Republic and Indiana. Lastly, there is a question mark. Currently, my plans are up in the air, so not knowing where I will be next is at times scary but also exciting!

Filed under: Art, Exhibitions, IMA Staff

 

The Evolution of Rococo

Today’s guest blogger is DAS member Sheri Conner. Sheri is an interior designer who teaches history of furniture and other courses for the Art Institute Online Division’s Interior Design program.

How did we get from this …

Fig: 1, Nicolas Heurtaut, 1755, Suite of four fauteuils à la reine (flat-back armchairs) © 1994 RMN / Daniel Arnaudet http://www.louvre.fr/en/oeuvre-notices/set-four-fauteuil-la-reine-armchairs

Fig: 1, Nicolas Heurtaut, 1755, Suite of four fauteuils à la reine (flat-back armchairs)
© 1994 RMN / Daniel Arnaudet

… to this …

Fig. 2, John Belter (American), “Armchair,” 1855 Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. C. Harvey Bradley, 80.482

Fig. 2, John Belter (American), “Armchair,” 1855
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Mrs. C. Harvey Bradley, 80.482

… to this?!

Fig. 3, Alessandro Mendini (Italian, b. 1931), “Poltrona di Proust” lounge chair, 1978 Indianapolis Museum of Art, Robertine Daniels Art Fund in Memory of Her Late Husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr. and Her Late Son, Michael Fairbanks, 2013.15 © Alessandro Mendini

Fig. 3, Alessandro Mendini (Italian, b. 1931), “Poltrona di Proust” lounge chair, 1978
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Robertine Daniels Art Fund in Memory of Her Late Husband, Richard Monroe Fairbanks Sr. and Her Late Son, Michael Fairbanks, 2013.15
© Alessandro Mendini

And what the heck does THIS have to do with it???

Fig. 4, François Boucher (French, 1703-1770), “Idyllic Landscape with Woman Fishing,” 1761 Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Krannert, 60.248

Fig. 4, François Boucher (French, 1703-1770), “Idyllic Landscape with Woman Fishing,” 1761
Indianapolis Museum of Art, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Herman C. Krannert, 60.248

Rococo style originated in Paris during the reign of King Louis XV. Upon the death of his great-grandfather Louis XIV, the Regent temporarily relocated the aristocratic center from the palace of Versailles to Paris. The new court quarters consisted of townhomes and apartments, creating a need for smaller scaled furnishings. In her book, The Annotated Mona Lisa, Carol Strickland describes the period as, “… a shift in French art and society from the serious and grandiose to the frothy and superficial,” noting that, “… the nobility lived a frivolous existence devoted to pleasure.” Décor took on a light appearance in terms of scale, color and ornamentation to fit with the intimate interiors and care-free lifestyle. Other European countries and the U.S. had their own interpretations of Rococo style.

The name Rococo derives from the French rocaille, which means shell. Rococo style is primarily associated with the decorative arts; however, painters of the time embraced it wholeheartedly. François Boucher for example, was commissioned to paint large-scale bucolic scenes consisting of rosy-cheeked goddesses and putti frolicking in lush gardens and pastoral landscapes (fig. 4). These themes were also translated into furniture design (fig 1). Rococo art and design has been described as romantic, idyllic, curvaceous, naturalistic, and asymmetrical.

Rococo styled seating and case pieces were curvilinear and visually delicate. Carved shells, flowers and botanical forms, scrolls, fruit, cherubs, and serpentine lines are all distinctive features of Rococo furniture. The cabriole leg is highly indicative of Rococo style, often terminating in scrolled, or claw and ball feet. Upon discovery of the ruins of Pompeii, Rococo design fell out of style giving way to the Neoclassic period.

Fast forward 100 years. Rococo is revived! Nineteenth century Rococo Revival furniture is larger, heavier, darker, more symmetrical and heavily carved. Industrial techniques were employed such as mechanical carving, coil springs for comfort, and new methods for laminating and bending wood. Original Rococo furniture was only available to royalty and the wealthy elite. This, along with the affordability rendered by mass production, made the revival version popular among the rising middle class during Victoria’s reign in England.

Pamela Wiggins asserted in her article, Who Was John Henry Belter?, “When it comes to Rococo Revival furniture, John Henry Belter (fig. 2) was no doubt the master craftsman working in the mid-1800s.” He is known for innovations in lamination and carving, securing patents for several techniques and mechanisms related to furniture manufacturing. Belter brought high furniture design to the U.S.; finally we were on par with Europe! Often imitated by his contemporaries, Belter destroyed plans and molds of his furniture so it would be very difficult to duplicate after his death.

Time ticked on … design along with it. Between the wars, furniture designers created radical revolutionary objects for the purpose of mass production. The Modernist Tradition led contemporary design into the later decades of the 2oth century. It viewed design as industry. Stemming from the Bauhaus’ early rejection of historic forms and ornamentation, designers working in the Modern mode embraced geometric forms and new materials like tubular steel and plastic. Form was ever ruled by function.

Along came the Italian design groups Alchemia and Memphis, who promoted a design-as-art ideal in the late 1970s/early 1980s. Based on this new Postmodern approach, design welcomed a decorative, historicizing tradition. Function was secondary. Manufacturers began to hire international designers who were raised to the level of superstars. People like Alessandro Mendini (fig. 3) viewed themselves as “non-designers,” creating personas and brands identifiable as their own style.

Handmade, one-of-a-kind, limited editions replaced mass production. Common recognizable forms and historic styles were resurrected in new and exaggerated ways marked by pattern, ornament, rich color, and luxury. Flexibility and range of materials allowed new sculptural possibilities for furniture. Postmodernist designers in a sense, mined history to conceive works like Mendini’s Proust armchair. Can you see it gestating in Boucher’s idyllic landscape?

Filed under: Art, Contemporary, Design, Guest Bloggers

 

April Showers

It’s raining. A lot. I am severely tempted to complain. A lot. Then I remember the last three summers when it did NOT rain. A lot. Then I push aside that temptation and think of all that rain as water in the bank to be spent when moisture funds run low. The bareroot perennials in the root cellar can wait another week or two and they will be fine. The spring clean-up of garden beds can wait. The pansies don’t arrive until next week so I don’t have them to addle my brain over the rain. Rather, the rain is a chance to get paperwork wrapped up that soon there will be no time to deal with. Volunteers have returned and time for indoor activities disappears rapidly now.

From my office window I can see green buds swelling on woody plants. Some maple trees are blooming. The male goldfinches are again gold. Spring has arrived and there is no turning back. I realize that does not mean Mother Nature will let us move smoothly on through April and May. She may well have a couple bitch slaps planned for us. But … not a damn thing I can do about that. Enjoy the moment and hope for the best.

Digitalis ‘Polkadot Princess’

Digitalis ‘Polkadot Princess’

Lots of blooming plants appearing now. Well, maybe not lots but a good many. I would show you some pictures but it is raining too hard right now to do that. So I will cover a few more of the new plants we are adding to the gardens this year.

In an earlier post I mentioned a foxglove we are adding this year, but we are actually adding second this year. Another sterile hybrid, Digitalis ‘Polkadot Princess’ (part of the Polkadot series) looks more like a traditional foxglove.

Bred by the folks at Thompson & Morgan it gets 2 to 3 feet tall and blooms from early summer to early fall thanks to its lack of seed production. If it does well I will consider adding ‘Polkadot Polly,’ the peachy colored sister.

This next plant we are taking a bit of a chance with and pushing it to the limit of its hardiness zone. Euphobia x martini ‘Ascot Rainbow’ is a zone 6 plant, maybe 5b. And technically we are a zone 6 region. Except when we are not. But what the hey? Nothing ventured, nothing gained.

Euphobia x martini ‘Ascot Rainbow’

Euphobia x martini ‘Ascot Rainbow’. Photo courtesy of www.PerennialResource.com.

‘Ascot Rainbow’ grows about 20” x 20”, wants full sun, and should have good drainage in winter. It does bloom in late spring but this is one you grow for the foliage. The green and yellow variegation takes on deep pink and burgundy when weather cools down in fall. The new growth always has a touch of this but it intensifies with the cooler temperatures. Interestingly, the showy bracts (structures that surround the real flowers) are variegated as well. ‘Ascot Rainbow’ makes a great container plant also.

Ipomoea lobata (aka Mina lobata or Quamaclit lobata)

Ipomoea lobata (aka Mina lobata or Quamaclit lobata)

One of the finest annual flowering vines will put on its show on the fence outside the Greenhouse sales area. Ipomoea lobata, or Mina lobata, or Quamaclit lobata is gorgeous. I mean GORGEOUS! And the only things more intriguing than the flowers are the common names. Spanish flag. Firecracker vine. And my absolute favorite, Exotic love vine.

Oh hell yeah! That is exotic love and I’m feeling that love all the way to my very soul. Exotic love vine grows to several feet and blooms start appearing in mid-summer. The flowering continues up ‘til frost. Jim grows these from seed. You can too.

The rain has let up but I know the minute I go outside with the camera it will return. Just thinking about it made the thunder start again. Over the next several days I expect plants to simply explode out of the ground. A little sun and a little warmth and everything is going to want to express its joy of surviving the winter. Check you gardens frequently so you don’t miss a thing. And if you are missing anything then you don’t want to miss Perennial Premiere April 26 and 27. We will have just what you’ve been missing.

In the meantime, how high’s the water, Mama?

april_showers_vid

Filed under: Greenhouse, Horticulture, IMA Staff, Oldfields

 

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