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Raising the roof in 100 Acres

Designed by Marlon Blackwell Architects, the 100 Acres Visitors Pavilion will serve as the cornerstone of the park and promises to be one of the region’s signature architectural landmarks.

The form of the building takes inspiration from the structure and geometry of a fallen, folded leaf. The large angular deck folds back on itself to form the canopy above, both of which are constructed to allow for the free flow of sunlight and rain water, and the unique visible steel structure of the building is reminiscent of the leaf’s skeletal veins.

(via Flickr)

Here’s something really cool: the Pavilion will be a LEED certified structure, with careful attention paid to environmental sensitivity and energy efficiency throughout the design and construction process. To find out more about the eco-friendliness of the Pavilion, click HERE.

And since you’re here, check out this conversation between architect Marlon Blackwell and structural engineer Guy Nordensen:

Filed under: Art and Nature Park, Design, IMA TV

3 Responses to “Raising the roof in 100 Acres”

  • avatar
    joe Says:

    nice work in destroying the beautiful nature sanctuary that used to be there…ever since the bulldozers and construction equipment started the process of ruining the environment by the lake, the animals (notably deer and fox) have not been seen around there…hope you all are quite proud of ####### up a lovely little slice of untouched nature in the middle of the city by ‘installing’ your ####### ‘art’…WTF is wrong with you people anyway, I use to at least think artists had a bit more consideration and respect for nature than the average un-conscious corporate ####### in this ####### up city but even the ‘artists’ here are wholly-owned corporate #######…and that ###### ‘boat’ that was dropped in the lake is the most hideous and UN-artistic piece of crap one could imagine…you all LITERALLY paved paradise and put up a parking lot (and an ugly ####### building!) Was it just too hard to NOT ####### with one of the few remaining untouched pieces of land in Marion County? To quote my old granny, ####### ALL Y’ALL!!!

    This comment has been edited to remove profanity

  • avatar

    I disagree with the first poster, I think the architecture is really cool and it’s not a bad thing that we’re building within nature’s confines. It’s there to be used, or else we wouldn’t have it.

  • avatar
    Fan Says:

    In response to Joe: 100 Acres is still a nature sanctuary. The Island residents continually saw deer every night. The Museum actually has had a very light print on this property, which is now open for a wide audience to enjoy in many ways. The Visitor Pavilion was built in the most environmentally sensitive way. And IMA has planted 3,000 native trees to introduce a variety of species increasing the Health of the entire White River watershed. Art and man’s use of this flood plain continues. And this Park gives standing to Indianapolis as a City worth visiting. If Joe learned more about the art installations I think he could appreciate them from a more positive perspective.

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