Back to imamuseum.org

Hanging on a String

The design and fabrication collective Ball-Nogues will be installing a site specific work in the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion through September 2. Founded by Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues in 2005, the Los Angeles based collective creates installations that are situated between design, art, and architecture. Using adapted raw materials such as string or steel, and everyday objects such as tables, shirts, or clothespins, Ball-Nogues’ installations evoke a sense of wonder as they innovatively engage public spaces. See more of their work here.

Their massive installation at the IMA, titled Gravity’s Loom, will be composed entirely of colored string draped from an aluminum hanging system affixed to the wall.  Gravity’s pull causes the strings to become an arc shape, and an accumulation of various lengths of string in the Pavilion will converge to form a shape reminiscent of an inverted architectural dome. Ball-Nogues’ installation is an intervention into the expanse of the Pavilion—hanging a mere 3.5 feet from the floor at its lowest point, the form of Gravity’s Loom creates wide pathways through which visitors can navigate the space.

Gravity’s Loom is composed with over 30 miles of string, dyed and cut by a programmable machine called the Insta-llator 2 with the Variable Information Atomizing Module. Designed by Ball-Nogues, the Insta-llator applies paint to each individual string in precise locations and cuts each string to a prescribed length determined by an integrated custom software system. Fabricated in Los Angeles, the strings have arrived in Indianapolis on small spools organized according to the location where the string will hang. Each spool contains one length of string which will span the Pavilion at varying dimensions to create the swooping, inverted dome attached to the walls near the Pavilion’s forty foot ceilings. You can see a similar installation in progress here.

If you come to the museum between now and September 2, you’ll be asked to enter through a temporary alternate entrance due to heavy equipment necessary to construct Gravity’s Loom in the Pavilion. But you’ll be able to see the progress as the installation nears completion from behind stanchions on the 1st floor or from the 2nd floor balcony.

To hear the Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues discuss their work, come to the IMA on September 2.

See you there.

The design and fabrication collective Ball-Nogues will be installing a site specific work in the Efroymson Family Entrance Pavilion through September 2. Founded by Benjamin Ball and Gaston Nogues in 2005, the Los Angeles based collective creates installations that are situated between design, art, and architecture. Using adapted raw materials such as string or steel, and everyday objects such as tables, shirts, or clothespins, Ball-Nogues’ installations evoke a sense of wonder as they innovatively engage public spaces. See more of their work at: http://www.ball-nogues.com.

Filed under: Art, Current Events, Exhibitions

2 Responses to “Hanging on a String”

  • avatar
    Katie Neville Says:

    I’m really looking forward to seeing this installation. I have so many questions! Why does gravity pull the strings in an arc instead of straight down? Will air circulating in the pavilion move the strings?

  • avatar
    Amanda York Says:

    Hi Katie,

    Gravity pulls the strings straight down in a way that resembles an arc, similar to (but certianly more complicated than!)the arcs made by electrical wires strung between telephone poles.

    You have a good question–I’m not sure if there will be enough air circulation to move the strings. But I’ve noticed so far that the appearance of the strings varies greatly from morning to evening; the colors of the strings becoming much more subdued as the light grows brighter throughout the day. I’m very curious to see how this installation will change over time!

    Thanks for your interest, and I hope you can come see Gravity’s Loom!

  • Trackbacks