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Ai Weiwei: Art, Activism, and Technology

On April 5, Ai Weiwei: According to What?—the IMA’s latest featured exhibition—opened to the public. A major retrospective of the artist’s work, this not-to-be-missed exhibition includes examples from the broad spectrum of the artist’s practice, which encompasses sculpture, photography, video, and site-specific architectural installations, as well as the design for the “Bird’s Nest” stadium for the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing. Walking past some of the works in the show, visitors may be inspired to learn more about the man who created these pieces and the circumstances that drove him to do so. In conjunction with the exhibition, the IMA is employing new in-gallery technology to facilitate these inquiries and help audiences engage with the work of this extraordinary artist.

According-to-Ai-Weiwei

In-Gallery iPads

Visitors to Ai Weiwei: According to What? will be able to dig deeper into the artist’s biography and his artistic practice through additional content available on iPads installed within the exhibition space. Outlining key events in Ai’s life and the main themes around which his art revolves, these in-gallery tools will provide greater context for the works on display and help users gain a better understanding of the artist and his intent. In addition, visitors will have access to interviews with Ai in which he speaks about his art, his activism, and his recent experiences with the Chinese authorities.

 

According to Ai Weiwei

Before the exhibition opened in Indianapolis, the IMA asked Ai Weiwei several questions about his life, his practice, and his passions. Video responses provided by Ai are now available both online and on site at stations located just outside the exhibition. Visitors are encouraged to watch Ai’s responses and then provide their own reactions. This user-generated content will help to build a broader online conversation about themes addressed in Ai’s practice.

This exhibition is organized by the Mori Art Museum, Tokyo, and the Indianapolis Museum of Art.

On Twitter? Join the conversation by using #whoisaiweiwei.

Filed under: Exhibitions, New Media, Technology

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