Back to imamuseum.org

The Venini Chandelier sparkles again

Since the IMA took ownership of the Miller House and Garden in 2009, we have come to know more intimately the gift of a 20th-century architectural masterpiece. The Miller House is worthy of many superlatives, but as an older house requiring care and maintenance it presents challenges and surprises just as would any other. The questions may be framed slightly differently, but the joys and frustrations are much the same.

Bonnie Cate and Jeanine Franke (Miller House housekeeper) cleaning individual glass pieces while Ben Wever, site Administrator, and Bradley Brooks gently remove each strand of glass from the chandelier.

Bonnie Cate and Jeanine Franke (Miller House housekeeper) cleaning individual glass pieces while Ben Wever, site Administrator, and Bradley Brooks gently remove each strand of glass from the chandelier.

A task that we knew we would face one day was bulb replacement and cleaning of the Venini chandelier above the Millers’ dining table. This fixture was not part of the original furnishing scheme for the house, but came as a later addition after the Millers purchased it in Italy in about 1960. We had heard stories of the care and effort required of Miller employees to dismantle the chandelier for cleaning, but being reluctant to tackle such a daunting project, I had pushed it to the back burner where it stayed until nearly every bulb was out. Now we had no choice. Dismantle or go dark!

Chandelier with all metal and glass components removed. Tags indicate pattern of glass colors to help with reassembly.

Chandelier with all metal and glass components removed. Tags indicate pattern of glass colors to help with reassembly.

To prepare for the task, we padded and covered the dining table and placed a series of folding tables nearby on which we could wash and dry each of the 200 individual polyhedral glass “prisms.” A crew of four went to work; two to stand on the table to dismantle the chandelier, and two to do the washing and drying. In this design, the glass elements are suspended from a steel frame on linked wires, each pendant group fastened to the frame with a tiny nut and bolt. Tedious work, but we soon found the system and a rhythm. It took until early evening to reassemble everything, but with the glass cleaned, the sparkle of the chandelier was restored, more charming than ever.

The newly cleaned Venini chandelier lit up.

The newly cleaned Venini chandelier lit up.

With the glass off the frame, it was evident that the chandelier still had its original European wiring and fittings, which had been adapted to accept standard U.S. chandelier-base bulbs. Yellowed with age, they are past due for a rewiring. That will be a task for the winter. Just like every old house project, one thing only leads to another.

Filed under: Conservation, Design, Miller House

2 Responses to “The Venini Chandelier sparkles again”