Morning at Grand Manan

 
Artist
Creation date
Materials
oil on canvas
Dimensions
25 x 50 in. 42-1/2 x 68 in. (framed)
Credit line
Martha Delzell Memorial Fund
Accession number
70.65
Collection
Currently On View

Morning at Grand Manan is a prime example of Luminism, a style characterized by tranquil landscapes, barely visible brushstrokes, precisely rendered detail and glowing light.

Bricher favored working along the North Atlantic coast, including Grand Manan Island, a summer resort in New Brunswick, Canada.

The artist; Vose Gallery 1878; IMA 1970
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Alfred Bricher's Seascapes

"Alfred Bricher was a painter of seascapes, primarily panoramic coastal views rendered in cool, clear colors and sharply defined compositions. He traveled up and down the North Atlantic seaboard, recording on canvas the interactions of light, water, land, and atmosphere. The quiet inlet and large rocky cliffs of Grand Manan Island, a summer resort in New Brunswick, Canada, were among his favorite subjects. This canvas, painted at the peak of Bricher's career, presents a tranquil view of the island, a radiant scene animated by the flowing surf, the rugged profile of the cliffs, and the cluster of sails against the sky at sunrise.

Morning at Grand Manan displays the aesthetic of the Luminist School of painting, which emphasized precise depictions of light and atmosphere in landscapes of panoramic scale. With its clearly defined horizon line, crisp colors, glowing light, and barely visible brushstrokes, Morning at Grand Manan exemplifies Luminist qualities of harmony and order and exhibits the strong sense of geometry that pervades Bricher's work. Bricher's paintings were popular and widely known in his time, and there was a steady market for color lithographs of his picturesque coastal scenes. After 1868, the artist took up painting in watercolor, and in 1873 became a member of the American Watercolor Society. From then on he devoted himself entirely to watercolor."

Lee, Ellen Wardwell, Anne Robinson, and Alexandra Bonfante-Warren. Indianapolis Museum of Art: Highlights of the Collection. Indianapolis: Indianapolis Museum of Art, 2005, p. 135.

Alfred Thompson Bricher: A Marine Painter’s Summer Sojourns along the Bay of Fundy

Alfred Thompson Bricher grew up in Newburyport, Massachusetts, and began painting landscapes when he was nineteen. He studied at the Lowell Institute in Boston and at the academy in Newburyport, Massachusetts, but was primarily self-taught. He set up a studio in Boston in 1858, and became a popular marine painter. His work was reproduced in numerous chromolithographs. Bricher was a painter of seascapes, primarily panoramic coastal views rendered in cool, clear colors and sharply defined compositions. He traveled up and down the North Atlantic seaboard, recording on canvas the interactions of light, water, land, and atmosphere. Bricher was considered the last of the important American Luminist painters, all of whom shared an interest in harmony, order, and light. An observer of a Bricher painting noted: “he makes water sparkle like diamonds in a silver setting.”

The quiet inlet and large rocky cliffs of Grand Manan Island, a summer resort in New Brunswick, Canada, were among Bricher’s favorite subjects. This canvas, painted at the peak of Bricher’s career, presents a tranquil view of the island, a radiant scene animated by the flowing surf, the rugged profile of the cliffs, and the cluster of sails against the sky at sunrise. Morning at Grand Manan displays the aesthetic of the Luminist School of painting, which emphasized precise depiction of light and atmosphere in landscapes of panoramic scale. With its clearly defined horizon line, crisp colors, glowing light, and barely visible brushstrokes, Morning at Grand Manan exemplifies Luminist qualities of harmony and order and exhibits the strong sense of geometry that pervades Bricher’s work.

Brown, Jeffrey R. Alfred Thompson Bricher (1837-1908). Indianapolis, Indiana: Indianapolis Museum of Art, 1973.

Indianapolis Museum of Art: Highlights of the Collection (2005)

Alfred Bricher was a painter of seascapes, primarily panoramic coastal views rendered in cool, clear colors and sharply defined compositions. He traveled up and down the North Atlantic seaboard, recording on canvas the interactions of light, water, land, and atmosphere. The quiet inlet and large rocky cliffs of Grand Manan Island, a summer resort in New Brunswick, Canada, were among his favorite subjects. This canvas, painted at the peak of Bricher's career, presents a tranquil view of the island, a radiant scene animated by the flowing surf, the rugged profile of the cliffs, and the cluster of sails against the sky at sunrise.

Morning at Grand Manan displays the aesthetic of the Luminist School of painting, which emphasized precise depictions of light and atmosphere in landscapes of panoramic scale. With its clearly defined horizon line, crisp colors, glowing light, and barely visible brushstrokes, Morning at Grand Manan exemplifies Luminist qualities of harmony and order and exhibits the strong sense of geometry that pervades Bricher's work. Bricher's paintings were popular and widely known in his time, and there was a steady market for color lithographs of his picturesque coastal scenes. After 1868, the artist took up painting in watercolor, and in 1873 became a member of the American Watercolor Society. From then on he devoted himself entirely to watercolor.

In Luminism, time stops and the moment is locked in place.
-Art historian Barbara Novak, 1979