Instrumentation

Conservation scientists use many of the same spectroscopic, microscopic, calorimetric, and chromatographic techniques employed in the mainstream sciences. However, because of the precious nature of the samples being analyzed, an even higher importance is placed on techniques which can be applied non-destructively and in situ. When sampling of artwork is unavoidable, it is imperative that the techniques be microanalytical; samples from artwork are rarely visible to the naked eye. In addition to the many analytical instruments found in the conservation lab, numerous wet chemical tests are also employed, as are mechanical testing equipment, microsample preparation tools, and accelerated aging apparatus.

Instrumentation

  • Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) Microspectroscopy
  • Raman Microspectroscopy
  • Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (LC-MS)
  • Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectroscopy (Py-GC-MS)
  • X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Spectroscopy
  • Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM-EDS)
  • Optical Microscopy (PLM, fluorescence, metallography)
  • Microfadeometry (MFT)
  • Weatherometer
  • Environmental Chamber
  • Microbalances
  • Modulated Differential Scanning Calorimetry (MDSC)
  • Fiber Optic Reflectance Spectroscopy (FORS)